Bead pendant, Saxon
Blue glass marbled bead pendant with small metal ring attached, found during extensive Wraysbury Manor Farm excavations. Identified through comparison with examples in the British Museum (more information may be requested from Wraysbury Manor Farm object file detailing interpretation by British Museum). Object has received conservation attention (lab report no. 4126).
Comb, Saxon
Made of bone/antler part of the head of the comb is missing but 18 teeth remain. Found in Wraybury.
Knife blade, Saxon
Made of iron, this little knife would have a wooden handle. Found in Wraybury.
Loom weight, Saxon
It would have been used to weigh a spindle when wool was wound by hand. A woman who spun was called a spinster. Possibly Anglo-Saxon. Found in Wraybury
Pot, Roman
Base of a Roman mortarium found near Hogoak Lane in the southern part of Bray Parish, near Maidenhead in the 1990s.
Bone disc, Anglo-Saxon
Perforated bone disc with incised decorative line on one side. It probably would have been used to weigh a spindle when wool was wound by hand. A woman who spun was called a spinster. Found in Wraysbury. Possibly Anglo-Saxon.
Pin, Saxon
Made of bronze and broken into two pieces, with a four-sided decorative top, Found in Wraybury. dated as Anglo-Saxon
Floor tile, Medieval
Hand made Medieval two-colour [glazed] floor tile found during alterations at Oxley's premises at 4, High Street, Windsor in 1964. Almost certainly made at Penn, Bucks in the 15th century.
Indian Elephant Molar, about 1900
Indian elephant's molar tooth from its jaw 'upper M3'. This was found in Taplow gravel beds, near Maidenhead. When is was found remains unknow however the museum acquired it in the 1950s. It was originally recorded in the museum collection as having been a Mammoth's tooth. In 2011 curators at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History identified the tooth as an upper molar of an Indian elepha
Piece of wall plaster, Roman
One of three pieces of Roman wall plaster from Cox Green villa, painted orange-red. Found during the excavation of Cox Green Roman villa in 1959. Other finds from the excavation were also given to the Museum. The Villa was started in the early 2nd century (100 - 150 AD) and occupation continued until the 4th Century (300 - 400 AD)
Roman Nail
One of seven iron nails found during the excavation of Cox Green Roman Villa in 1959. The Villa was started in the early 2nd century (100 - 150 AD) and occupation continued until the 4th Century (300 - 400 AD). Numerous other finds from the Cox Green Roman Villa excavation were also given to the museum collection.
Roman Roof Tile
Fragment of a Roman roof tile from Cox Green villa excavation from 1959, with impression of dog's paw. Other finds from the excavation were also given to the Museum. The Villa was started in the early 2nd century (100 - 150 AD) and occupation continued until the 4th Century (300 - 400 AD).
Pottery Rim Sherd
Roman Samian ware rim sherd found at Cox Green villa excavation in 1959, possibly made in the South of France. Other finds from the excavation were also given to the Museum. The Villa was started in the early 2nd century (100 - 150 AD) and occupation continued until the 4th Century (300 - 400 AD)
Samian ware sherd. Roman
Roman imitation Samian ware rim sherd, possibly made in Sandford-on-Thames, Oxon. Found at Cox Green villa excavation in 1959, possibly made in the South of France. Other finds from the excavation were also given to the Museum. The Villa was started in the early 2nd century (100 - 150 AD) and occupation continued until the 4th Century (300 - 400 AD)
Roman Pottery Sherd
Base of a Roman vase dug up during excavations for the new reservoir on St Leonards Hill, Windsor in 1960. An estimated date is given between 100-300 AD. It is identified as buff sandy ware and the small shape of base indicates the complete vase being small.
Human Remains, Skull, Neolithic Period
Found in the River Thames near Monkey Island, Bray, this highly mineralised human skull is between 10,500 and 4,500 years old, belonging to either the Mesolithic or Neolithic period. The person’s body may have been placed in or near the river as a funeral rite; – it could also, of course, have arrived there through geological processes (erosion and deposition). Over the course of time, however
Tetradrachma (coin), dated 284-305.
This tetradrachm coin was struck at Alexandria, Egypt, under the Roman Emperor Diocletian (244-311 AD). It was probably issued at around 288 AD. The coin, allegedly picked up in Vansittart Road, Windsor, has naturally corroded over the years. Yet, the portrait in profile of Diocletian is clearly visible on the coin’s obverse, circumscribed by Greek text. The reverse, however, is a little more di
Pottery sherd, Roman
Sherd of a rim of Roman pot. the sherd was found in soil dump at Clewer Mill. the soil may have come from the site of Caley's, High Street, Windsor.
Polished Axe-head
Polished grey flint, dated to around 5,000 years old. It was found in the Thames at Old Windsor. We do not know when it was found but became part of the museum collection in 1953.
Antler Pick
Marked with a small label stating 'Found at Eton Water works, 1891, 15 ft below water'. Antler is very strong and durable, and was less concussive than heavy rocks when used to finish flint objects. Antlers were also used as digging tools, hammers, picks and axe handles.